Las Posadas (The Inns of Bethlehem) Advent Novena Pageant December 16-24

(Go to Therese’s Carols for Las Posadas)


1. St. Joseph
Pray give us lodging, dear sir, in the name of heav’n.
All day since morning to travel we’ve giv’n.
Mary, my wife, is expecting a child.
She must have shelter tonight. Let us in, let us in!

2. Innkeeper
You cannot stop here, I won’t make my house an inn.
I do not trust you, your story is thin.
You two might rob me and then run away.
Find somewhere else you can stay. Go away, go away!

3. St. Joseph
Please show us pity, your heart cannot be so hard.
Look at poor Mary, so worn and so tired.
We are most poor, but I’ll pay what I can.
God will reward you, good man. Let us in, let us in!

4. Innkeeper
You try my patience. I’m tired and must get some rest.
I’ve told you nicely, but still you insist.
If you don’t go and stop bothering me,
I’ll fix you, I guarantee. Go away, go away!

5. St. Joseph
Sir, I must tell you my wife is the queen of heav’n,
chosen by God to deliver his Son.
Jesus is coming to earth on this eve.
(Oh heaven, make him believe!) Let us in, let us in!

LasPosadasDeBelenTHUMBNAIL6. Innkeeper
Joseph, dear Joseph, oh how could I be so blind?
Not to know you and the virgin so fine!
Enter, blest pilgrims, my house is your own.
Praise be to God on his throne! Please come in, please come in!

7. Finale
Enter, enter, holy pilgrims, holy pilgrims.
Welcome to my humble home.
Though ‘tis little I can offer,
all I have please call your own.

LasPosadasILLUSTRATION
Continue reading

Therese’s Carols for Las Posadas

(Go to Las Posadas – Advent Novena Pageant – December 16-24)

1. Away in the Manger
2. Ave Maria
3. Alma Redemptoris Mater
4. Come Thou Long Expected Jesus
5. O Come All Ye Faithful/Adeste Fideles
6. O Come Divine Messiah
7. O Come, O Come, Emmanuel
8. People, Look East
9. Silent night
10. The Angel Gabriel from Heaven Came
11. Ye Clouds of Heaven

Microsoft Publisher 2010 production file for lyrics


1. Away in a manger Video | Audio
Away in a manger,
no crib for a bed,
The little Lord Jesus
laid down his sweet head.
The stars in the bright sky
looked down where he lay,
The little Lord Jesus
asleep on the hay.

The cattle are lowing,
the baby awakes,
But little Lord Jesus no crying he makes.
I love thee, Lord Jesus! Look down from the sky,
And stay by my cradle til morning is nigh.

Be near me Lord Jesus I ask thee to stay.
Close by me forever, And love me I pray.
Bless all the dear children, In thy tender care.
And take them to heaven, To be with thee there.

avemariagregorian2. Ave Maria Video | Audio
Ave Maria gratia plena
Dominus tecum
Benedicta tu in mulieribus
Et benedictus fructus ventris tui Jesu
Sancta Maria mater Dei
ora pro nobis peccatoribus
Nunc et in ora mortis nostrae.
Amen.

almaredemptorismater3. Alma Redemptoris Mater Video | Audio
Alma Redemptoris Mater,
quae per via caeli porta manes,
et stella maris,
succurre cadenti,
surgere qui curat, populo:
tu quae genuisti,
natura mirante,
tuum sanctum Genitorem
Virgo prius ac posterius,
Gabrielis ab ore
Sumens illud Ave,
peccatorum miserere.

4. Come Thou Long Expected Jesus Video | Audio
Come, thou long expected Jesus,
born to set thy people free;
from our fears and sins release us,
let us find our rest in thee.

Israel’s strength and consolation,
hope of all the earth thou art;
dear desire of every nation,
joy of every longing heart.

Born thy people to deliver,
born a child and yet a King,
born to reign in us forever,
now thy gracious kingdom bring.

By thine own eternal spirit
rule in all our hearts alone;
by thine all sufficient merit,
raise us to thy glorious throne.

5. O Come All Ye Faithful/Adeste Fideles Video | Audio
O come, all ye faithful, Joyful and triumphant,
O come ye, O come ye to Bethlehem;
Come and behold him, Born the King of angels;

(Chorus)
O come, let us adore him,
O come, let us adore him,
O Come, let us adore him,
Christ the Lord.

Sing, choirs of angels, Sing in exultation,
Sing, all ye citizens of heaven above;
Glory to God In the highest;
(Chorus)

Yea, Lord, we greet thee, Born this happy morning;
Jesus, to thee be glory given;
Word of the Father, Now in flesh appearing;
(Chorus)

6. O Come Divine Messiah Video | Audio
O come, divine Messiah! The world in silence waits the day
When hope shall sing its triumph, And sadness flee away.

Refrain:
Dear Savior haste;
Come, come to earth,
Dispel the night and show your face,
And bid us hail the dawn of grace.
O come, divine Messiah!
The world in silence waits the day
When hope shall sing its triumph,
And sadness flee away.

O Christ, whom nations sigh for,
Whom priest and prophet long foretold,
Come break the captive fetters;
Redeem the long-lost fold.

Refrain

You come in peace and meekness,
And lowly will your cradle be;
All clothed in human weakness
Shall we your Godhead see.

Refrain

7. O Come, O Come, Emmanuel Video | Audio
O come, O come, Emmanuel,
And ransom captive Israel,
That mourns in lonely exile here
Until the Son of God appear.

Refrain
Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel
Shall come to thee, O Israel.

O come, Thou Rod of Jesse, free
Thine own from Satan’s tyranny;
From depths of hell Thy people save,
And give them victory o’er the grave.

Refrain

O come, Thou Day-Spring, come and cheer
Our spirits by Thine advent here;
Disperse the gloomy clouds of night
And death’s dark shadows put to flight!

Refrain

O come, Thou Key of David, come,
And open wide our heavenly home;
Make safe the way that leads on high,
And close the path to misery.

Refrain

O come, O come, Thou Lord of Might,
Who to Thy tribes on Sinai’s height
In ancient times didst give the law
In cloud, and majesty, and awe.

Refrain

8. People, Look East Video | Audio
People look east The time is near
Of the crowning of the year.
Make your house fair as you are able,
Trim the hearth and set the table.
People, look east and sing today:
Love, the guest, is on the way.

Furrows, be glad. Though earth is bare,
One more seed is planted there:
Give up your strength the seed to nourish,
That in course the flower may flourish.
People, look east and sing today:
Love, the rose, is on the way.

Birds, though you long have ceased to build,
Guard the nest that must be filled.
Even the hour when wings are frozen
God for fledging time has chosen.
People, look east and sing today:
Love, the bird, is on the way.

Stars, keep the watch. When night is dim
One more light the bowl shall brim,
Shining beyond the frosty weather,
Bright as sun and moon together.
People, look east and sing today:
Love, the star, is on the way.

Angels, announce with shouts of mirth
Christ who brings new life to earth.
Set every peak and valley humming
With the word, the Lord is coming.
People, look east and sing today:
Love, the Lord, is on the way.

9. Silent night Video | Audio
Silent night, holy night!
All is calm, all is bright.
Round yon Virgin, Mother and Child.
Holy infant so tender and mild,
Sleep in heavenly peace,
Sleep in heavenly peace.

Silent night, holy night!
Shepherds quake at the sight.
Glories stream from heaven afar
Heavenly hosts sing Alleluia,
Christ the Savior is born!
Christ the Savior is born.

Silent night, holy night!
Son of God love’s pure light.
Radiant beams from Thy holy face
With dawn of redeeming grace,
Jesus Lord, at Thy birth.
Jesus Lord, at Thy birth.

10. The Angel Gabriel from Heaven Came Video | Audio
The angel Gabriel from heaven came,
His wings as drifted snow, his eyes as flame:
“All hail to thee, O lowly maiden Mary,
Most highly favored lady.”
Gloria!

“For know a blessed mother thou shalt be,
All generations laud and honor thee;
Thy son shall be Emmanuel, by seers foretold,
Most highly favored lady.”
Gloria!

Then gentle Mary meekly bowed her head;
“To me be as it pleaseth God,” she said.
“My soul shall laud and magnify God’s holy name.”
Most highly favored lady.”
Gloria!

Of her, Emmanuel, the Christ, was born
In Bethlehem all on a Christmas morn,
And Christian folk throughout the world will ever say:
“Most highly favored lady.”
Gloria!

11. Ye Clouds of Heaven Video | Audio
Ye Clouds of heaven open wide
And once again this Adventide
Rain down the Savior from above
Who comes to teach his way of love.
Behold a virgin bearing Him
who comes to save us from our sin
The prophets cry “Prepare His Way!”
Make straight His path to Christmas Day.

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Coventry Carol – Lully Lulla, Thou Little Tiny Child

Rachel Weeps For Her Children, Because They Are No More
LyricsRefrain
Lully, lulla, thou little tiny child,
bye, bye, lully lullay, thou little tiny child,
bye, bye, lully lullay.

O sisters too, how may we do,
for to preserve this day,
this poor youngling for whom we do sing,
bye, bye lully lullay.

Refrain

Herod the king in his raging,
charged he hath this day,
his men of night, in his own sight,
all young children to slay.

Refrain
Then woe is me, poor child, for thee!
And every morn and day,
for thy parting not say nor sing
bye, bye, lully lullay.

Refrain

We Should Hear The Blessed Lord Jesus’ True ‘Bread of Life Narrative’ in Song

This article is under development. Major sections are subject to revision.

Call to Petition Oregon Catholic Press (Breaking Bread hymnal) to Edit ‘See Us Lord About Your Altar’ regarding the lyric “Now his form is but a sign”

In an intrinsically subjective esthetic medium, music with lyrics, a musical piece published by OCP–”See Us Lord About Your Altar”–concerned with the Catholic Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist, implicitly conveys lack of belief in the full, authentic, essential Eucharistic teaching.


Drakes Broughton hymn tune by Sir Edward Elgar, to which John Greally applied his lyrics “See Us Lord About Your Altar”

The doctrinally deficient lyrics, “Now his form is but a sign”, fail to convey the primal sacramental definition of “a sign that really and truly  effects what it signifies”, an outward sign instituted by Christ to give grace. This is in the medium of music which, because of the immediacy of its impact, is prone to cause uncritical acceptance of any doctrinal proposition conveyed through it, whether correct or incorrect.

DrakesBroughton-SeeUsLordAboutYourAltar-verse3-THUMBNAIL

This will be a request for the lyrics of a song distributed to the majority of American Catholic parishes by the Oregon Catholic Press (OCP), to be slightly changed to more affirmatively reflect Jesus’ wishes, as He clearly expressed them.

What does this mean?

The lyrics of a piece music published by the Oregon Catholic Press,
See Us Lord About Your Altar“, can be improved to better reflect Jesus’ explicit teachings about the Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist.

The Problematic Verse (3)

  • Once were seen the blood and water:
    Now is seen but bread and wine;
    Once in human form he suffered,

    Now his form is but a sign.

The subtle assertion that Jesus’ form within the Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist “is but a sign”, less than adequately conveys the full, authentic, essential Catechesis about the Holy Eucharist, in an environment prone to non-critical acceptance of doctrinal content, the medium of music which by its very nature renders its audience prone to unthinking, emotional acceptance of its meaning. This environment requires very careful discrimination about the precise formulation of Catechetical content.

Perhaps unintentionally, the verse seems to express a belief that the Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist is merely a symbol, not literally our Blessed Lord Jesus’ Body and Blood. Continue reading

How To Pray The Rosary, The Biblical Prayer

 

Praying in set rather than improvised prayers is not necessarily heaping up vain repetitions (Mt 6:7). In the Garden of Gethsemane, our Lord Jesus prayed multiple times to the Father using the same words (Mt 26:44). And in Rev 4:8, the angels “never cease to sing ‘Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God Almighty’.” Just as a husband doesn’t say to his wife, “I told you I love you once already, at the beginning of our marriage,” but says “I love you!” often, hopefully, many times every day, so sincere and devout, repetitious prayer to God – in time-honored phrases better than any we could ever improvise – is never wasted. We are guided in praying meaningfully and devoutly in the Mysteries of the Rosary, meditating on the life of our Lord Jesus Christ and His mother.

rosaryscripturestable

rosary12345

  1. Make the Sign of the Cross and say the “Apostles’ Creed.”
  2. Say the “Our Father.”
  3. Say three “Hail Marys” (for Faith, Hope and Divine Love).
  4. Say the “Glory be to the Father.”
  5. Announce the First Mystery; then say the “Our Father.”
  6. Say ten “Hail Marys,” while meditating on the Mystery.
  7. Say the “Glory be to the Father.” Say the “O My Jesus.”
  8. Announce the Second Mystery; then say the “Our Father.”
  9. Repeat 6 and 7 and continue with Third, Fourth and Fifth Mysteries in the same manner.

rosarywithbibilicalproofsthumbnailThe Sign of the Cross (1 Cor 1:23; 1 Cor 2:2; Luke 9:23; Gal 3:1): (Holding your thumb, index finger, middle finger of your right hand together while tucking the ring finger and pinky finger toward your palm, to signify the Holy Trinity), touch your forehead as you say “In the name of the Father”; touch your breastbone or top of your belly as you say “and of the Son”; touch your left shoulder, then right shoulder, as you say “and of the Holy Spirit, Amen”.

The Apostles’ Creed : I believe in God, the Father Almighty, Creator of heaven and earth; and in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord; Who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended to the dead; the third day He arose again. He ascended into heaven, and sits at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty; from thence He shall come to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the Holy Catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body and life everlasting. Amen.

The Our Father (Mt 6:9-13): Our Father, Who art in heaven; hallowed be Thy name; Thy kingdom come; Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us, and lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil. Amen. The Hail Mary (Biblical references below): Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, (bow your head) Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.

Glory Be to the Father (Mt 28:19): (Make the Sign of the Cross, as above) Glory be to the Father , and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit, as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

O My Jesus : O my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell. Lead all souls to heaven, especially those who have most need of Thy mercy.

Hail, Holy Queen (1 Kings 2:17-20): (Closing Prayer, after the “O My Jesus” prayer of final Mystery) Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve; to thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this valley of tears. Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy toward us, and after this our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus. O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. Amen. (Close with the Sign of the Cross.)

Thomas Aquinas: Animals Cannot Choose – Only Man

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MAN VS. ANIMAL

     What’s the difference? Is it a matter of degree? Are we just a little smarter? Do we just have more and different instincts, like a religious instinct?

Gregory of Nyssa says that irrational animals act willingly but not from choice … the difference between the sensitive appetite (animal instinct) and the (free) will is that … the sensitive appetite is determinative to one particular thing … whereas the will … is indeterminate in respect of particular goods. Consequently choice properly belongs to the (human free) will, and not to the sensitive appetite which is all that irrational animals have. Wherefore irrational animals are not competent to choose… . An irrational animal takes one thing in preference to another because its appetite is naturally determinate to that thing. Wherefore as soon as an animal, by its sense or its imagination, is offered something to which its appetite is naturally inclined, it is moved to that alone, without making any choice (I-II,13,2).

The difference between humans and animals is in two powers that we have that the animal does not: reason and free will, or free choice. These powers are not instincts. Instincts are unfree. They are necessarily determined to one thing only, as we are hungry only for food and thirsty only for drink and tired only for sleep and have sexual desire only for sex. We are like the animals in having animal instincts. But we are more. Animals see and will only the concrete particular good. We understand the universal good, and therefore are free to choose between various particular goods. That is why we have free choice.

     Only free choice is meritorious, praiseworthy, or blameworthy. God does not praise or blame us for our animal instincts. That’s why it doesn’t matter morally how you feel when you pray or when you choose (although good feelings help), only your free choice to believe God, hope in God, and love God, counts.

     How often we act like animals! How often we let instinct determine behavior.
Senses and sense appetites perceive only particular goods, like this particular piece of delicious food. Reason perceives good in general, and therefore—because of our reason—we can freely choose between different concrete particular goods, as animals cannot. They always act according to the strongest instinct that is driving them at the time: if they are more tired than hungry, they will sleep; if more hungry than tired, they will eat. They always see and respond to whatever particular good looms largest in their view.

     (1) Sometimes this is both good and necessary, like breathing or eating.

     (2) Sometimes it is neither necessary nor good, like sinning by following our passions contrary to our reason.

     (3) And sometimes it is not necessary—the instinct, once recognized, is freely followed—but it is good, like choosing to do for God what our natural instincts incline us to do anyway, like helping the suffering out of instinctive compassion, or giving thanks out of instinctive gratitude. Our instincts can help us as well as hinder us. Most of our life is lived on the animal level; we can use our instincts as we tame animals; we can transform that part of ourselves into the raw material (the “material causes”) for good choices. In fact much of moral character-building consists in forming and educating the instincts.

     This is less onerous than it seems, since we have more good instincts than evil ones. Most of the things we do out of a combination of natural instinct and some free choice to follow the instinct have positive moral value—eating, reading, working, conversing, caring for our own and others’ welfare—because they are acts that are natural and rightly directed to good ends. That is the refutation of pessimism. The refutation of optimism is the fact that our instincts are not unfallen, so that all of the things we do and all of our instincts are prone to infection by some evil, especially the master evil of selfishness.

     (4) And we can also act contrary to an instinct or animal passion, as animals cannot. For instance we can fast, as animals cannot; we can choose to offer up an innocent, orderly passion (hunger) for a higher good (God).

     (5) We can also avoid sin by choosing to offer up and “mortify” a disordered passion instead of obeying it.

     Kreeft, Peter. Practical Theology: Spiritual Direction from St. Thomas Aquinas (Kindle Locations 2770-2782). Ignatius Press. Kindle Edition.

Se llamaba Martín – una canción sobre San Martín de Porres por el obispo Dermott Molloy (†2005)

SeLlamabaMartinSheetMusicTHUMBNAIL


Se Llamaba Martin, Mons. Demetrio Molloy. Obispo de Huancavelica, Peru (1982-2005)

Una historia hermosa, vamos a contar, porque de alegría, nos hace cantar Martín (BIS)

Érase un negrito, que de pequeñito ya solía rezar
y cuando veía hombres que sufrían ya sabía llorar.

(Coro)
Martín, se llamaba Martín,
negrito chiquitito, con alma de marfil.

Gatos y ratones, en el mismo plato, hacía comer
y el odio en los hombres, con su alegre escoba, lograba barrer.

CORO

Si a ti Martín, blanco de nieve, te hizo Dios
hasta el cielo azul, lleva a los hombres, con ese amor.

CORO

Se Llamaba Martin, Domenicos de Peru

DomenicosDePeru_SanMartinDePorres

«His name was Martín.»

Fray Escoba – (Brother Broom)

san-martin-de-porres

“I’m going to tell you a story about a little Black man,
[negrito chiquitito, con alma de marfil, "with a soul of ivory"],
who, when he was young, he prayed a lot.
And when he saw people suffering, he cried.
He made cats [dogs] and mice eat off the same plate.
And with his happy broom,
he swept away the hatred that he saw in men’s hearts.
Holy St. Martin, bring us to heaven.

Podcast – Click below for the Song from Bishop Molloy

Se llamaba Martín

Una historia hermosa, vamos a contar, porque de alegría
nos hace cantar Martín (BIS)

Érase un negrito, que de pequeñito ya solía rezar
y cuando veía hombres que sufrían ya sabía llorar.

Martín, se llamaba Martín,
negrito chiquitito,
con alma de marfil.

Gatos y ratones, en el mismo plato, hacía comer
y el odio en los hombres, con su alegre escoba, lograba barrer.

Martín, se llamaba Martín,
negrito chiquitito,
con alma de marfil.

Si a ti Martín, blanco de nieve, te hizo Dios
hasta el cielo azul, lleva a los hombres, con ese amor.

Martín, se llamaba Martín,
negrito chiquitito,
con alma de marfil.

Martin de Porres is often depicted as a young mulatto friar wearing the old habit of the Dominican lay brother, a black scapular and capuce, along with a broom, since he considered all work to be sacred no matter how menial. He is sometimes shown with a dog, a cat and a mouse eating in peace from the same dish.

San Martin de Porres is often depicted as a young mulatto friar wearing the old habit of the Dominican lay brother, a black scapular and capuce, along with a broom, since he considered all work to be sacred no matter how menial. He is sometimes shown with a dog, a cat and a mouse eating in peace from the same dish.

BishopDermottMalloy_recorder

El Condor Pasa (flauta dulce)

Podcast – Click below for the Song


Bishop William Dermott Molloy McDermott
(born 10 May 1930, died 19 Aug 2013),
Bishop of Huancavélica, Peru,
19 May, 1976 to 18 June, 2005 (29 Years)

  • a priest for 58 years
  • a bishop for 37 years
P. Doroteo Borda and Bishop Dermott Molloy

P. Doroteo Borda and Bishop Dermott Molloy

Dear Tayta Demetrio:
by P. Doroteo Borda
["Tayta" is a Quechua word meaning "Dad" and "Demetrio" is "Dermott" in Spanish.]

Riding on your “white horse,” you have just left us for the Home of the Eternal Father after being sick for eight years. Since you are brave, our Father God blessed you with one of the heaviest crosses and you have borne it with elegance. You not only took up your cross with love, but you carried all of your sons on it too.

I recall very vividly the day I first went to confession with you. The church was packed with faithful and there was no room. You were seated behind the church on a bench under the cypress tree. Your hands rested on your knees, and I was at your right. I compared my dirty and dark hands with yours, clean and white. I thought you were an angel and I wasn’t mistaken, for you have lived every day of your life with so much simplicity and candor.

I remember how you spoke Quechua better than anyone and made it your second language. Now I understand that you identified yourself perfectly with the people of Huancarama: “To the weak I became weak, that I might win the weak. I have become all things to all men…” ( 1 Cor 9:22).

Whenever you came for a mission, after Mass the children of Arcahua waited eagerly for the delicious caramels you brought us. Truly, as Pope Francis asked, you were a shepherd “living with the smell of the sheep,” since you shared our homes and customs and ate our humble peasant dishes. And you were happy to sleep at night under sheepskin covers.

It was in October 1975 that you first spoke about opening the seminary in Abancay and you suggested that those of us who wanted to be priests should leave our names in the parish at Huancarama. My mother and sister realized that this was the moment for me to go with you to Abancay.

Whoever crossed your path experienced how big your heart was. You loved my humble family tenderly. I remember my father Gregorio being as excited as a child when you came to visit us, and you would laugh along with him, a child yourself.

Bishop Molloy reading the Bible in Quechua.

Bishop Molloy reading the Bible in Quechua.

You used to ride through our villages on your chestnut-colored horse, bringing joy to the hearts of the people. And you would sing: “I’ve asked Tayta God, and he knows it very well, that when he calls me to his side, I’ll come riding on my horse.” Now with your friend Enrique Pèlach, both of you excellent horsemen, you gallop in heaven on white thoroughbreds.

Dear Father Demetrio: now that you are in the Home of the Eternal Father, ask that your sons may know how to ride as you did. That we be generous and seek nothing outside holiness. From the saddle of your white horse, bless your people of Huancarama and your beloved diocese of Huancavelica.

Thank you for being the instrument for my finding my priestly vocation and for the gift of holy Baptism by which you gave me life in Christ.

Your son entrusts himself to your intercession,
Santos Doroteo Borda López

Mi caballo blanco (tradicional)

Podcast – Click below for the Song

Es mi caballo blanco
como un amanecer,
siempre juntitos vamos,
es mi caballo mas fiel.

Mi caballo, mi caballo
galopando va.
Mi caballo, mi caballo
se va y se va.

Al taita Dios le pido
y El lo sabe muy bien,
si a su lado me llama a su lado,
en mi caballo iré.

Mi caballo, mi caballo
galopando va.
Mi caballo, mi caballo
se va y se va.

“When he calls me to his side, I’ll come riding on my horse”

Bishop Dermott Molloy, who spent many years in Peru confronting material poverty and terrorism, died on August 19, 2013. In this article, Fr. Doroteo Borda thanks the bishop for his own priestly vocation.

Below is a brief biograpy of Bishop Dermott Molloy, who died on August 19, along with an article by Fr. Santos Doroteo Borda, who thanks “Tayta Demetrio” for his Christian and priestly vocation. ["Tayta" is a Quechua word meaning "Dad" and "Demetrio" is "Dermott" in Spanish.]

Bishop Dermott Molloy was born in Dublin, Ireland in 1930, and ordained a priest in 1955 for the diocese of Birmingham (Alabama, USA). Upon going to Peru as a missionary, he worked as a parish priest in Huancarama for 14 years, where he thoroughly learned the native Quechua language. In 1976 he was named auxiliary bishop of Huancavelica, and in 1982, titular bishop. The diocese is located in the heart of the Peruvian Andes, 3,800 meters above sea level.

He was a member of the Priestly Society of the Holy Cross, an association of priests intrinsically united to Opus Dei.

StaTeresaJornet

Santa Teresa Jornet

In Huancavelica Bishop Molloy oversaw the construction of the “Santa Teresa Jornet” nursing home for the elderly, the “Carmen Escrivá” center for the advancement of women, several soup kitchens, 16 churches and the city’s minor and major seminaries.

He translated the Bible into Quechua, and promoted many projects to strengthen the Quechua cultural patrimony, including the restoration of a number of colonial churches. He helped create a school of music employing the Suzuki method, which had a big social impact on many young people in the region.

In 2005 he suffered a series of debilitating strokes that left him partially paralyzed. After moving to Lima, each week priests from his former diocese made the eleven hour trip to the capital to visit him in the Daughters of St. Camillus nursing home, where he offered all his sufferings for the Church.

Program Name: What it means to be evangelistic
smallspeaker.gif (241 bytes) Listen Now
Series Name: Mother Angelica Live
Host: Mother Angelica with Bishop Dermott Molloy
Date Produced: 8/8/2000
Description:

Fray Escoba – (Brother Broom)

san-martin-de-porres

“I’m going to tell you a story about a little Black man,
[negrito chiquitito, con alma de marfil, "with a soul of ivory"],
who, when he was young, he prayed a lot.
And when he saw people suffering, he cried.
He made cats [dogs] and mice eat off the same plate.
And with his happy broom,
he swept away the hatred that he saw in men’s hearts.
Holy St. Martin, bring us to heaven.

Podcast – Click below for the Song from Bishop Molloy

Se llamaba Martín

Una historia hermosa, vamos a contar, porque de alegría, nos hace cantar Martín (BIS)

Érase un negrito, que de pequeñito ya solía rezar
y cuando veía hombres que sufrían ya sabía llorar.

(Coro)
Martín, se llamaba Martín,
negrito chiquitito, con alma de marfil.

Gatos y ratones, en el mismo plato, hacía comer
y el odio en los hombres, con su alegre escoba, lograba barrer.

CORO

Si a ti Martín, blanco de nieve, te hizo Dios
hasta el cielo azul, lleva a los hombres, con ese amor.

Coro

Martin de Porres is often depicted as a young mulatto friar wearing the old habit of the Dominican lay brother, a black scapular and capuce, along with a broom, since he considered all work to be sacred no matter how menial. He is sometimes shown with a dog, a cat and a mouse eating in peace from the same dish.

San Martin de Porres is often depicted as a young mulatto friar wearing the old habit of the Dominican lay brother, a black scapular and capuce, along with a broom, since he considered all work to be sacred no matter how menial. He is sometimes shown with a dog, a cat and a mouse eating in peace from the same dish.

BishopDermottMalloy_recorder

El Condor Pasa (flauta dulce)

Podcast – Click below for the Song


Bishop William Dermott Molloy McDermott
(born 10 May 1930, died 19 Aug 2013),
Bishop of Huancavélica, Peru,
19 May, 1976 to 18 June, 2005 (29 Years)

  • a priest for 58 years
  • a bishop for 37 years
P. Doroteo Borda and Bishop Dermott Molloy

P. Doroteo Borda and Bishop Dermott Molloy

Dear Tayta Demetrio:
by P. Doroteo Borda
["Tayta" is a Quechua word meaning "Dad" and "Demetrio" is "Dermott" in Spanish.]

Riding on your “white horse,” you have just left us for the Home of the Eternal Father after being sick for eight years. Since you are brave, our Father God blessed you with one of the heaviest crosses and you have borne it with elegance. You not only took up your cross with love, but you carried all of your sons on it too.

I recall very vividly the day I first went to confession with you. The church was packed with faithful and there was no room. You were seated behind the church on a bench under the cypress tree. Your hands rested on your knees, and I was at your right. I compared my dirty and dark hands with yours, clean and white. I thought you were an angel and I wasn’t mistaken, for you have lived every day of your life with so much simplicity and candor.

I remember how you spoke Quechua better than anyone and made it your second language. Now I understand that you identified yourself perfectly with the people of Huancarama: “To the weak I became weak, that I might win the weak. I have become all things to all men…” ( 1 Cor 9:22).

Whenever you came for a mission, after Mass the children of Arcahua waited eagerly for the delicious caramels you brought us. Truly, as Pope Francis asked, you were a shepherd “living with the smell of the sheep,” since you shared our homes and customs and ate our humble peasant dishes. And you were happy to sleep at night under sheepskin covers.

It was in October 1975 that you first spoke about opening the seminary in Abancay and you suggested that those of us who wanted to be priests should leave our names in the parish at Huancarama. My mother and sister realized that this was the moment for me to go with you to Abancay.

Whoever crossed your path experienced how big your heart was. You loved my humble family tenderly. I remember my father Gregorio being as excited as a child when you came to visit us, and you would laugh along with him, a child yourself.

Bishop Molloy reading the Bible in Quechua.

Bishop Molloy reading the Bible in Quechua.

You used to ride through our villages on your chestnut-colored horse, bringing joy to the hearts of the people. And you would sing: “I’ve asked Tayta God, and he knows it very well, that when he calls me to his side, I’ll come riding on my horse.” Now with your friend Enrique Pèlach, both of you excellent horsemen, you gallop in heaven on white thoroughbreds.

Dear Father Demetrio: now that you are in the Home of the Eternal Father, ask that your sons may know how to ride as you did. That we be generous and seek nothing outside holiness. From the saddle of your white horse, bless your people of Huancarama and your beloved diocese of Huancavelica.

Thank you for being the instrument for my finding my priestly vocation and for the gift of holy Baptism by which you gave me life in Christ.

Your son entrusts himself to your intercession,
Santos Doroteo Borda López

Mi caballo blanco (tradicional)

Podcast – Click below for the Song

Es mi caballo blanco
como un amanecer,
siempre juntitos vamos,
es mi caballo mas fiel.

Mi caballo, mi caballo
galopando va.
Mi caballo, mi caballo
se va y se va.

Al taita Dios le pido
y El lo sabe muy bien,
si a su lado me llama a su lado,
en mi caballo iré.

Mi caballo, mi caballo
galopando va.
Mi caballo, mi caballo
se va y se va.

“When he calls me to his side, I’ll come riding on my horse”

Bishop Dermott Molloy, who spent many years in Peru confronting material poverty and terrorism, died on August 19, 2013. In this article, Fr. Doroteo Borda thanks the bishop for his own priestly vocation.

Below is a brief biograpy of Bishop Dermott Molloy, who died on August 19, along with an article by Fr. Santos Doroteo Borda, who thanks “Tayta Demetrio” for his Christian and priestly vocation. ["Tayta" is a Quechua word meaning "Dad" and "Demetrio" is "Dermott" in Spanish.]

Bishop Dermott Molloy was born in Dublin, Ireland in 1930, and ordained a priest in 1955 for the diocese of Birmingham (Alabama, USA). Upon going to Peru as a missionary, he worked as a parish priest in Huancarama for 14 years, where he thoroughly learned the native Quechua language. In 1976 he was named auxiliary bishop of Huancavelica, and in 1982, titular bishop. The diocese is located in the heart of the Peruvian Andes, 3,800 meters above sea level.

He was a member of the Priestly Society of the Holy Cross, an association of priests intrinsically united to Opus Dei.

StaTeresaJornet

Santa Teresa Jornet

In Huancavelica Bishop Molloy oversaw the construction of the “Santa Teresa Jornet” nursing home for the elderly, the “Carmen Escrivá” center for the advancement of women, several soup kitchens, 16 churches and the city’s minor and major seminaries.

He translated the Bible into Quechua, and promoted many projects to strengthen the Quechua cultural patrimony, including the restoration of a number of colonial churches. He helped create a school of music employing the Suzuki method, which had a big social impact on many young people in the region.

In 2005 he suffered a series of debilitating strokes that left him partially paralyzed. After moving to Lima, each week priests from his former diocese made the eleven hour trip to the capital to visit him in the Daughters of St. Camillus nursing home, where he offered all his sufferings for the Church.

Program Name: What it means to be evangelistic
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Series Name: Mother Angelica Live
Host: Mother Angelica with Bishop Dermott Molloy
Date Produced: 8/8/2000
Description:

 

Saint Josephine Bakhita

Giuseppina Margherita Fortunata

 

“The law of the Lord is perfect, it gives wisdom to the simple.” (Ps 19: 8)

“These words from today’s Responsorial Psalm resound powerfully in the life of Sr Josephine Bakhita. Abducted and sold into slavery at the tender age of seven, she suffered much at the hands of cruel masters. But she came to understand the profound truth that God, and not man, is the true Master of every human being, of every human life. This experience became a source of great wisdom for this humble daughter of Africa.” (Extract from the Homily of Pope John Paul II at the Canonization of St Josephine Bakhita)

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